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20121201
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the operations that the chilean navy had undertaken for helping out their citizens. we have a panel here today, we actually have two panels we're going to roll through. one is stories from the field, if you will, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about puttin
instructor. she completed a 7-month deployment. captain mike napolitano is serving with the navy's expedition training group. while deployed in 2004, he spearheaded maritime patrol relief efforts toing the 2004 indian ocean tsunami, as well as numerous theater cooperation efforts throughout the pacific and in 2009 captain napolitano reported as commanding officer of the expeditionary training group. this is a fabulous panel and i know you're going to appreciate what they have to say. rear admiral, i think you'll start. >> first of all on behalf of the chilean navy i would like to thank so much to san francisco fleet week, particularly to admiral gary roughhead for being invited to participate in this senior seminar. it's a privilege for me to be here and to share with you the experience that we had just during and after the earthquake that we had in chile in february 27, 2010. most of the lessons learned that i'm going to show here to you is part of your concern and i'm very glad you are taking that in account so i think you are absolutely in the right path. anyway, it's a ma
as a navy. as you see here, chile is located in the southwest coast of south america and we had an earthquake on february 27, 2010, with an intensity of 8.8 richter scale located approximately in the center of the country. the subduction zone, the area where the plate and the south american plate made contact was 250 kilometers. that means that the intensity was felt above 8 in about one-third of the country. as you can see, in the highlight color you can see the people who was affected with that earthquake at about 6 million people. that means more than 40 percent of the chilean population. in terms of energy was released, you can see there it's one trillion kilograms of tnt, that means an 8.8 earthquake. another comparison could be 18,000 times the hiroshima atomic bomb. it's supposed it occur less than two a year above 8. chili has first runner up with 9.5 with bolivia, 10 minutes duration. this one was 8.8, at that moment was no. 4, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes. usually that thing
, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's entire navy, and we had two of them on the way to taiwan. so, i was confident that no one was going to challenge the fleet that we were sending there. this -- and in fact, they did not challenge it even before our two carrier battle ships arrived in taiwan, the crisis was over and the maneuvers had been subsided. this positive result was possible because of the military capability of our navy and because both carrier battle groups were battle ready and able to steam towards their destination in less than 24 hours. so, why were we able to respond so effectively? certainly one important reason, because the technology in our ships was the best in the world. the results are true, that the training and the spirit of our sailors was superb. and we had absolutely first-class leadership in the navy
was superb. and we had absolutely first-class leadership in the navy. you will hear later today from admiral gary some examples of just how impressive that leadership is. the operational readiness of the fleet was a result, first of all, of having bases all around the world. but secondly because the strong program of exercise we conducted. the exercises were not only conducted on military scenarios, but we had an extensive set of exercises involved in humanitarian response. during the time i was secretary, we had a disaster response very similar to the one they're doing here in san francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we hav
, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charged with maintaining the freedom of those sea lanes. we had, of course, to be concerned as to whether there would be a challenge for that. we observed that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintai
as the command control because what we have here in the marine corps is similar to the navy. we have the installation, the regional installation command and also partners with the operational foresite. we allow the operational foresight, we maintain those but then we coordinate, cooperate, with the operational foresight once the call comes in for support. so we're able to do that obviously through memorandum of understandings and we have agreements and our wing operating orders allow for the fact the operational control, at least under operational response, maintains with the operators. the third aircraft wing maintains operational control but we send our operatives out to be controlled by the civic sight. we're comfortable with that and that's matured a lot in the last couple years. >> talked a lot about command and control and agreements and moving resources. one other question that came up yesterday we were discussing yesterday is how do communications occur specifically with regard to when we start talking about air ops and moving air resources around, how do we ensure that
fleet and lieutenant colonel demigan giving them a heads up. we (inaudible) navy and marine corps assets when we have severe weather events take place because we know if we're going to have that severe weather event, we could have one of those mega fires. we have a complex air space management tool. i'm the equivalent of a fact a, i fly in the ob10 bronco as a fact a and my job is to coordinate air space. we're dropping water and fire retardant instead of bombs and rockets. we work closely with cal guard, navy and marine corps aviation. we do that with squadron training. we still have khal lefrpg wills, i'm not going to lie to you. we have issues where tactical to air communication is difficult. cal guard, we purchased the radios for national guard aircraft and they installed them in their aircraft so we have robust communications with california national guard, with navy and marine corps it's still a work in progress. we have a work around with that with respect to tactical communications and we use coordinating helicopters to handle air to ground tactical situations and that is
. people tried to escape so they can't so they climb into the trees and when the navy get in there just about at the top of the trees. that's what we found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end
of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, next the navy in the coastal communities and in san feir fernandes island and doing an airlift to the most affected area. sanfernandes island is a very small island, only a thousand people living there, but it was completely destroyed. that's what we found when we arriving there, debris everywhere, and as you can see that was the port and the square before, a
guard, with navy and marine corps it's still a work in progress. we have a work around with that with respect to tactical communications and we use coordinating helicopters to handle air to ground tactical situations and that is relayed to the aircraft that are in trail. it's not perfect but it's a work around and it keeps everybody in the fight. >> prior to 20011 2011 the navy fire fighting capability was concentrated in one squadron. in 2011 it began to expand to other helicopter squadrons. one consequence of that would be multiple squadrons providing aircraft to cal fire to support the fire fighting effort and one somewhat simple but very effective solution was the use of defense connect on line, the dco chat room. basically cal fire personnel, along with all the individual squadrons, all connected realtime able to communicate and coordinate both from the squadron and also on scene. >> well, thank you. let's go ahead and move into relationships. we had a significant discussion yesterday about relationships and again the highlighted and supervisor chiu's comment
are here for the long time. on the installation side which we coordinate with cal fire and the navy we have annual exercise and we hit that every springtime prior to the fire season. i think what's also, it's important to remember that although it was stressed, the military members are members of the community as well so let's not forget that as far as active duty. although we're transient in nature, sometimes we're in deployment, many of us are home owners and we live in that community. we are part of that community as well. just like the guard, we have an interest in protecting our friends and neighbors. sustainment is, it's important to us and we'll maintain it especially on the region side. we're able to have these long-standing relationships while the operating force side goes forward and supports the on-going efforts, we are able to stay back here and sustain those relationships. >> just to follow on that, the navy squadrons that provide fire fighting capability are a combination of active and reserve components. one benefit of reserve components is more longevity is pilots i
for the navy. i lacked at his bay oh in the program, educated in georgia and he's had a great career in the navy commanding several hospitals, winning several awards and his most recent command was as the commander of walter reed, and i was so glad that he was here to hear the panel that we had with our medical peer to peer exercise. and he's going to talk to us now about navy medicine. with that, please help me welcome vice admiral matthew nathan. (applause). >> thank you, general, very much. well, it's a pleasure here and i'm honored to be able to speak in front of such a distinguished audience. secretary schultz, mrs. schultz, pleasure it see you and you lend tremendous gaffe tas to this program. general spees, distinguished flag officers, general officers and mostly everybody here who is in the readiness business, i am honored to be speaking to a group of people and that would include i think everybody in this hanger deck who is part of that cadre of individuals who when bad things happen and everybody runs out, your job is to run in. it doesn't get better than this coming out
the whole day today because soon i'll be headed over to treasure island, a former navy firefighting school, we'll have that facility about 14 years and we'll be welcoming 40 members from the u.s. marine corps, 20 members from the u.s. navy, 10 members the u.s. coast guard, where we will then partner with them and cross train them and use our techniques, reaching technical rescue and high and low rescue being demonstrated in display. we will also be having some of our u.s. navy personnel on ride-alongs with members on our ambulances, fire engines and trucks to continue with our cross training. so, it gives me great pride to be here to continue to serve as the fire chief, to welcome the military, and to say thank you to all of you. here's to an enjoyable fun-filled busy weekend. all the best, and thank you for your service. (applause) >> i wanted chief to tell you about that training. we first did it in 2010, search and rescue which we knew was a problem in haiti in the earth wake in the recovery. and like they say in san francisco, the fire department, we know how to do it, but when the big
a was mentioned this morning. that was a fantastic piece of work by the navy. it turned around the attitudes of niche a toward the united states. it was a the kind of building block we look for in an economic and security commons. just as when we in san francisco see not only what the military can bring to the party and help us with, not only how we can interact with the military, but also we say to ourselves, it's also up to us to do everything we can for ourselves. we're not kind of an outfit, it's easier for them to collaborate with us. so, all of these things are important to us as we have these exercises. so, i say this is a very worthwhile enterprise that will keep going. i tip my hat to my friend mike who really has been leading us in these efforts. and now i say as also the slogan, i guess you call it this morning, maybe it's what the navy says. i think it's a very good phrase. a global force for good. that's what we've been practicing, a global force for good. thank you. (applause) >> thank you, sir. thank you. thank you very much, sir. (applause) >> and for all of you, tomorrow we'
of command are critical in anything that we do. what better way to showcase what our united states navy and our marine corps, our sea-going services, bring to the table in an emergency response, but recognize that they also have another mission to do, macon island just came off a 7-month deployment, this is an era when we're pivoting to the pacific. the ring of fire is also in the pacific. over 35,000 on average fatalities a year over 35 billion dollars worth of damage and we see that year in and year out with tsunamis of catastrophic proportions. today the coast guard is dealing with the debris from that tsunami as it comes ashore here in the state waters as well. just it close on admire beeman's remarks, i think it's critical not just the work here at seminar but over a cup of coffee exchanging business cards because at the end of the day it's the partnerships that mufrt endure at time of crisis. thank you to the macon island for this show of force during this third fleet week. >> i'd like to bring up the mayor of the great city and county of san francisco. what a difference he's ma
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)